Supplementary Materials

Supplementary Material for:

Nodding syndrome may be an autoimmune reaction to the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus

Tory P. Johnson, Richa Tyagi, Paul R. Lee, Myoung-Hwa Lee, Kory R. Johnson, Jeffrey Kowalak, Abdel Elkahloun, Marie Medynets, Alina Hategan, Joseph Kubofcik, James Sejvar, Jeffrey Ratto, Sudhir Bunga, Issa Makumbi, Jane R. Aceng, Thomas B. Nutman, Scott F. Dowell, Avindra Nath*

*Corresponding author. Email: natha{at}ninds.nih.gov

Published 15 February 2017, Sci. Transl. Med. 9, eaaf6953 (2017)
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf6953

This PDF file includes:

  • Fig. S1. Representative image of immunoprecipitation experiments.
  • Fig. S2. Subtyping of leiomodin-1 autoantibodies from patients with nodding syndrome.
  • Fig. S3. Immunofluorescence of leiomodin-1–transfected cells with sera from unaffected village controls.
  • Fig. S4. Coimmunofluorescence of human neurons with leiomodin-1 and patient CSF.
  • Fig. S5. Leiomodin-1 transcripts are expressed in the brain as detected by RNA sequencing.
  • Table S1. Proteins with enriched autoantibodies in patients with nodding syndrome.
  • Table S2. Top four proteins with enriched autoantibodies in patients with nodding syndrome.
  • Table S3. Leiomodin-1 transcripts are expressed in the brain.
  • Table S4. Rabbit leiomodin-1 antibodies are neurotoxic.
  • Table S5. Antibodies in patient sera are neurotoxic.
  • Table S6. Leiomodin-1 antibodies from patients are neurotoxic.
  • Table S7. O. volvulus proteins identified by mass spectrometry.
  • Table S8. Leiomodin-1 antibodies cross-react with O. volvulus antigens.

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