Research ArticleMicrobiome

Antimicrobials from human skin commensal bacteria protect against Staphylococcus aureus and are deficient in atopic dermatitis

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Science Translational Medicine  22 Feb 2017:
Vol. 9, Issue 378, eaah4680
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aah4680

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  • RE: Antimicrobials from human skin commensal bacteria protect against Staphylococcus aureus and are deficient in atopic dermatitis
    • Dr Dianne Sika-Paotonu CQS MRSNZ, Associate Dean (Pacific)/Senior Lecturer Pathology & Molecular Medicine, Wellington School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Otago, New Zealand

    To the Editor,

    I read with keen interest the article presented by Nakatsuji T, et al (1) and entitled: “Antimicrobials from human skin commensal bacteria protect against Staphylococcus aureus and are deficient in atopic dermatitis.”

    Staphylococcus aureus is known to aggravate symptoms in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) sufferers and is often present in patients with AD. This research work investigated the role of normal skin bacteria and their potential lethal impact on S. aureus.

    Using isolates of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) collected from the skin of healthy and AD subjects, high-throughput screening techniques were employed to determine antimicrobial activity against. S. aureus. Findings showed these antimicrobial active CoNS strains were readily present on normal subjects and yet scarce on participants with AD.

    Results from this work also demonstrated a correlation between S. aureus colonization and low strain frequency, capable of antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generated by the CoNS species in animal models demonstrated that these peptides were protective, potent, strain-specific, selectively killing S. aureus, among other functions.

    That the reintroduction by topical application of antimicrobial CoNS strains to human subjects with AD as described by the authors was able to decrease S. aureus colonization, was indeed encouraging and overall draws attention to the potential interaction and interplay req...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.

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