Research ArticleCancer

Detection of somatic mutations and HPV in the saliva and plasma of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

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Science Translational Medicine  24 Jun 2015:
Vol. 7, Issue 293, pp. 293ra104
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa8507
  • Fig. 1. Schematic showing the shedding of tumor DNA from head and neck cancers into the saliva or plasma.

    Tumors from various anatomic locations shed DNA fragments containing tumor-specific mutations and HPV DNA into the saliva or the circulation. The detectability of tumor DNA in the saliva varied with anatomic location of the tumor, with the highest sensitivity for oral cavity cancers. The detectability in plasma varied much less in regard to the tumor’s anatomic location.

  • Table 1. Detection of tumor-derived DNA in saliva and plasma.

    The percentages of patients whose tumors were detectable through the examination of saliva, plasma, or both are shown, grouped by tumor site, stage, and HPV status.

    Saliva, % with
    mutations (95%
    confidence
    intervals) (total
    number studied)
    Plasma, % with
    mutations (95%
    confidence
    intervals) (total
    number studied)
    Saliva or plasma,
    % with mutations
    (95% confidence
    intervals) (total
    number studied)*
    Site
    Oral cavity100 (92–100%) (46)80 (52–96%) (15)100 (78–100%) (15)
    Oropharynx47 (30–65%) (34)91 (71–99%) (22)91 (71–99%) (22)
    Larynx70 (35–93%) (10)86 (42–99%) (7)100 (59–100%) (7)
    Hypopharynx67 (9.4–99%) (3)100 (29–100%) (3)100 (29–100%) (3)
    Stage
    Early (I and II)100 (83–100%) (20)70 (35–93%) (10)100 (69–100%) (10)
    Late (III and IV)70 (58–80%) (73)92 (78–98%) (37)95 (82–99%) (37)
    HPV
    Positive40 (23–59%) (30)86 (64–97%) (21)86 (64–97%) (21)
    Total76 (66–85%) (93)87 (74–95%) (47)96 (85–99%) (47)

    *Includes only patients from whom both saliva and plasma were available.

    Supplementary Materials

    • www.sciencetranslationalmedicine.org/cgi/content/full/7/293/293ra104/DC1

      Fig. S1. Tumor DNA is detectable in the saliva of patients before recurrence becomes clinically evident.

      Fig. S2. Patients with undetectable tumor DNA after surgery have better disease-free survival.

      Table S1. Patient demographics.

      Table S2. Primer sequences used in multiplex assay for identification of driver mutations in tumors.

      Table S3. Amounts of tumor-derived DNA in saliva and plasma.

    • Supplementary Material for:

      Detection of somatic mutations and HPV in the saliva and plasma of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

      Yuxuan Wang, Simeon Springer, Carolyn L. Mulvey, Natalie Silliman, Joy Schaefer, Mark Sausen, Nathan James, Eleni M. Rettig, Theresa Guo, Curtis R. Pickering, Justin A. Bishop, Christine H. Chung, Joseph A. Califano, David W. Eisele, Carole Fakhry, Christine G. Gourin, Patrick K. Ha, Hyunseok Kang, Ana Kiess, Wayne M. Koch, Jeffrey N. Myers, Harry Quon, Jeremy D. Richmon, David Sidransky, Ralph P. Tufano, William H. Westra, Chetan Bettegowda, Luis A. Diaz Jr., Nickolas Papadopoulos, Kenneth W. Kinzler, Bert Vogelstein,* Nishant Agrawal*

      *Corresponding author. E-mail: nagrawal{at}jhmi.edu (N.A.); vogelbe{at}jhmi.edu (B.V.)

      Published 24 June 2015, Sci. Transl. Med. 7, 293ra104 (2015)
      DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa8507

      This PDF file includes:

      • Fig. S1. Tumor DNA is detectable in the saliva of patients before recurrence becomes clinically evident.
      • Fig. S2. Patients with undetectable tumor DNA after surgery have better disease-free survival.
      • Legends for tables S1 to S3

      [Download PDF]

      Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following:

      • Table S1 (Microsoft Excel format). Patient demographics.
      • Table S2 (Microsoft Excel format). Primer sequences used in multiplex assay for identification of driver mutations in tumors.
      • Table S3 (Microsoft Excel format). Amounts of tumor-derived DNA in saliva and plasma.

      [Download Tables S1 to S3]

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