Research ArticleCancer

Adoptive transfer of activated marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes induces measurable antitumor immunity in the bone marrow in multiple myeloma

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Science Translational Medicine  20 May 2015:
Vol. 7, Issue 288, pp. 288ra78
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa7014

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ACT against multiple myeloma

Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) has had some success in treating certain types of cancer; however, widespread use is limited in part by the lack of tumor-specific targets. Tumor-infiltrating T cells may overcome this limitation for solid tumors. Noonan et al. now show in a phase 1 clinical trial that bone marrow can be a source of ACT for hematologic malignancies such as multiple myeloma. Marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs) demonstrated myeloma-specific immunity in the bone marrow up to 1 year after ACT, and a significant increase was observed in progression-free survival. If these results can be replicated in larger studies, MILs may represent a source for ACT for hematologic malignancies and bone marrow–infiltrating solid tumors.

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