Research ArticleCardiovascular Medicine

Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk

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Science Translational Medicine  06 Aug 2014:
Vol. 6, Issue 248, pp. 248ra105
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3009246

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  • Response to 'A great beginning'

    While the mouse and dog infarct data are in agreement with prior published work using transgenic expression of CD39, there are caveats particular to the thrombotic canine model that should be discussed.

    First, episodic occlusion of the coronary artery has been shown to precondition the heart, resulting in profound reduction in infarct size following a prolonged ischemic insult. From the data presented in the c...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.
  • A great beginning ... but not the end

    As an Interventional Cardiologist with research pursuits in this area I read with great enthusiasm the results presented in "Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk." The Authors are to be applauded on the work conducted. While the mouse and dog infarct data are in agreement with prior published work using transgenic expression of CD39, there a...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.

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