CommentaryInnovation

Teaching Biomedical Technology Innovation as a Discipline

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Science Translational Medicine  20 Jul 2011:
Vol. 3, Issue 92, pp. 92cm18
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002222

Figures

  • Fig. 1. Design within reach.

    Map of the “biodesign” process for medical technology innovation that shows the progression through three major phases (identify, invent, and implement). The individual boxes are content areas that form a basis for assessing core competencies. [IP, intellectual property; R&D, research and development]

    CREDIT: P. HUEY/SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE
  • Fig. 2. According to need.

    Shown is a conceptual approach to the concept-generation process. The input to the “Identify” stage of the process is multiple clinical needs, which are filtered down to those few needs with the most promising characteristics. These needs are fully researched, generating a needs specification (spec) that details the characteristics of an ideal solution. In the “Invention” stage, multiple concepts are generated for each need. Then, a second filtering process selects the strongest concept (the one that best fits its need specification) to move forward into development.

    CREDIT: P. HUEY/SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE

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