Research ArticleCancer

Analysis of recurrently protected genomic regions in cell-free DNA found in urine

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science Translational Medicine  17 Feb 2021:
Vol. 13, Issue 581, eaaz3088
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaz3088

You are currently viewing the editor's summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Detecting cancer by urine cell-free DNA

Detection of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in urine could be a noninvasive approach to diagnose cancer. However, urine cfDNA is very fragmented, making it difficult to use. Markus et al. analyzed fragmentation patterns in urine and plasma cfDNA using whole-genome sequencing in healthy individuals and those with cancer. Compared to cfDNA from healthy individuals, tumor-derived fragmentation patterns ending within recurrently protected regions occurred more frequently in urine. By comparing genome-wide differences in urine cfDNA fragmentation patterns, the authors could distinguish cancer samples from controls, suggesting that this approach might complement plasma cfDNA as a cancer diagnostic.

View Full Text

Stay Connected to Science Translational Medicine