Research ArticleGVHD

Long-term skin-resident memory T cells proliferate in situ and are involved in human graft-versus-host disease

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Science Translational Medicine  18 Nov 2020:
Vol. 12, Issue 570, eabb7028
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.abb7028

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Skin-deep persistence

Tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) in the skin play a critical role in responding to environmental assaults and maintaining homeostasis. Strobl et al. characterize Trm derived from CD69+ αβ memory T cell clones in the skin of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients, which persisted in the skin for years after transplantation. Single-cell RNA sequencing analysis revealed that Trm had higher levels of tissue retention genes and stem cell markers. The RUNX3 transcription factor and cell surface molecule galectin-3 were defined as markers of human skin Trm. These findings delineate features of human Trm that differ from their murine counterparts and reveal a role for the skin environment in their long-term persistence.

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