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18 April 2012
Vol 4, Issue 130

Cover image

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ONLINE COVER Stressed Out Cardiomyocytes. The image shows a cardiomyocyte (cardiac troponin T, green; sarcomeric α-actin, red; DAPI-stained nucleus, blue) that has disintegrated after treatment with norepinephrine. Sun et al. show that cardiomyocytes derived from iPS cells generated from the skin cells of patients with familial dilated cardiomyopathy recapitulate many of the features of this disease including susceptibility to stressors such as norepinephrine. Consequently, these cardiomyocytes can be used to learn more about the pathogenic mechanisms that cause familial dilated cardiomyopathy and to screen new candidate drugs that may be useful for treating this inherited cardiovascular disease. [CREDIT: J. WU, STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE]

About The Cover

Cover image expansion

ONLINE COVER Stressed Out Cardiomyocytes. The image shows a cardiomyocyte (cardiac troponin T, green; sarcomeric α-actin, red; DAPI-stained nucleus, blue) that has disintegrated after treatment with norepinephrine. Sun et al. show that cardiomyocytes derived from iPS cells generated from the skin cells of patients with familial dilated cardiomyopathy recapitulate many of the features of this disease including susceptibility to stressors such as norepinephrine. Consequently, these cardiomyocytes can be used to learn more about the pathogenic mechanisms that cause familial dilated cardiomyopathy and to screen new candidate drugs that may be useful for treating this inherited cardiovascular disease. [CREDIT: J. WU, STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE]