Research ArticlePUBLIC HEALTH

A common antimicrobial additive increases colonic inflammation and colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis in mice

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science Translational Medicine  30 May 2018:
Vol. 10, Issue 443, eaan4116
DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aan4116

eLetters is an online forum for ongoing peer review. Submission of eLetters are open to all. Please read our Terms of Service before submitting your own eLetter.

Compose eLetter

Plain text

  • Plain text
    No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests
CAPTCHA

This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

  • RE: Mice are not Men: Differences in metabolism of triclosan mean Yang et al findings have limited relevance for human health.

    Abstract: In a recent paper (A common antimicrobial additive increases colonic inflammation and colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis in mice” by Yang et al appearing in Science Translational Medicine Volume 10, May 30, 2018) the authors state : “We report that brief exposure to TCS, at relatively low doses, causes low-grade colonic inflammation, increases colitis, and exacerbates colitis-associated colon cancer in mice.” However, the authors did not account for the differences in TCS metabolism between mouse and man when calculating doses. The doses used in this study are 240, 1900, and 3000 times higher than exposure to brushing from a TCS containing toothpaste, with the majority of the findings observed at levels 1,900 times higher than exposure from brushing. As a result, the study did not use doses that could be characterized as "relatively low" and has limited relevance for human health.

    The authors of Yang et al. reported that exposure to TCS at relatively low doses resulted in low grade inflammation, and increased colitis and exacerbated colitis-associated colon cancer in mice. Colgate-Palmolive recognizes the important benefit of investigative scientific studies in animal models, which are an important element in identification of potential hazards and/or mechanistic pathways of a chemical. However, in this case the authors did not account for the differences in TCS metabolism between mouse and man when calculating doses. The doses used in th...

    Show More
    Competing Interests: None declared.